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Branching Out

As my 11 followers may know, my original purpose in starting this Tumblr was essentially personal branding as part of my job search for an IT support or sysadmin position.

During the time I have been maintaining this Tumblr, I have found that I actually rather like Tumblr as a blogging platform, and so will likely start a separate blog covering more diverse topics relating to my personal off-the-clock interests and thoughts soon.

Since I figure that it is a good way to keep myself in the loop regarding technology in general, I will continue to make an effort to update this blog a couple of times a week with content related to the IT and telecom industries, but it’s safe to say that I won’t be posting as much as I have to date for the foreseeable future.

Thanks for following along!

vmware-erdos:

What Will SysAdmins Do in the Automated Cloud Future?                                                                                                                            
Nobody would dispute that system administrators have been integral to keeping IT environments running. But that hasn’t stopped people from wondering whether sysadmins will still have a role in a future world of highly automated clouds.
They will, and it will be just as critical. But that role will also be very different.
Today, sysadmins are all about the VM. They’re akin to workers on a manufacturer’s production line. Sometimes they’re at the beginning of the line, figuring out where to place the VM and what services to connect to it, and then handing it off to developers who will add applications inside of it. Sometimes they’re at the end of the process, deploying the VM. Many times they’re manning the station, ready to add memory to fix poor performance or move a VM when a server fails.
But increasingly, advanced analytics engines are able to identify infrastructure anomalies and recommend remediation steps, and automation tools can put many of them into action. So what does that mean for sysadmins?
Instead of focusing on discrete tasks and spending large amounts of time on daily firefighting, sysadmins will be more strategic, like pilots overseeing entire operations.
Even though airplanes are capable of getting from point A to point B on their own thanks to intelligent systems and automation, pilots still man the cockpit. Their expertise is required to oversee and, often times, adjust the incredibly intricate and interdependent systems that keep planes flying. Pilots are the ones entrusted with getting passengers to destinations safely.
So, too, with sysadmins. The cloud—and the notion of software-defined data centers—have added order-of-magnitudes more complexity to IT environments. Instead of an application running on one VM, it may run on dozens of VMs, each of which has storage, load balancing, database and other services attached to it. Instead of the VM being the container, the application becomes the container. And each container is a system with many interdependent parts and services.
The sysadmin’s new role is to optimize and manage those systems. But unlike the way sysadmins have been managing VMs, they can’t hand-hold each of these complex systems. They’d run out of hours in a day before even scratching the surface. Rather, now that products such as VMware vCO, vCAC and App Director are being combined into a single automation stack, deeply integrated with vCenter Operations Management, and working together with SRM, vSAN and NSX, software can automatically handle many of the daily tasks. When more complex, critical problems arise, they’ll be flagged for the sysadmins, who will pull from their broad knowledge and nuanced understanding of storage, networks, applications and more, to triage and resolve them.
The sysadmins’ responsibilities won’t end there. By working at this higher level, they will be able to influence those systems in ways that help businesses operate more efficiently, cost-effectively and competitively. And that’s where their real value lies. Sysadmins of the future will be planners and problem solvers who leverage automated cloud environments and their advanced analytics capabilities. Like pilots, they’ll ensure the IT systems that businesses rely on can take them the enterprise where they it needs to go. 
By Janice Bedsole
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Canon EOS 5D Mark III
ISO
100
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f/1.2
Exposure
1/2500th
Focal Length
50mm

vmware-erdos:

What Will SysAdmins Do in the Automated Cloud Future?                                                                                                                            

Nobody would dispute that system administrators have been integral to keeping IT environments running. But that hasn’t stopped people from wondering whether sysadmins will still have a role in a future world of highly automated clouds.

They will, and it will be just as critical. But that role will also be very different.

Today, sysadmins are all about the VM. They’re akin to workers on a manufacturer’s production line. Sometimes they’re at the beginning of the line, figuring out where to place the VM and what services to connect to it, and then handing it off to developers who will add applications inside of it. Sometimes they’re at the end of the process, deploying the VM. Many times they’re manning the station, ready to add memory to fix poor performance or move a VM when a server fails.

But increasingly, advanced analytics engines are able to identify infrastructure anomalies and recommend remediation steps, and automation tools can put many of them into action. So what does that mean for sysadmins?

Instead of focusing on discrete tasks and spending large amounts of time on daily firefighting, sysadmins will be more strategic, like pilots overseeing entire operations.

Even though airplanes are capable of getting from point A to point B on their own thanks to intelligent systems and automation, pilots still man the cockpit. Their expertise is required to oversee and, often times, adjust the incredibly intricate and interdependent systems that keep planes flying. Pilots are the ones entrusted with getting passengers to destinations safely.

So, too, with sysadmins. The cloud—and the notion of software-defined data centers—have added order-of-magnitudes more complexity to IT environments. Instead of an application running on one VM, it may run on dozens of VMs, each of which has storage, load balancing, database and other services attached to it. Instead of the VM being the container, the application becomes the container. And each container is a system with many interdependent parts and services.

The sysadmin’s new role is to optimize and manage those systems. But unlike the way sysadmins have been managing VMs, they can’t hand-hold each of these complex systems. They’d run out of hours in a day before even scratching the surface. Rather, now that products such as VMware vCO, vCAC and App Director are being combined into a single automation stack, deeply integrated with vCenter Operations Management, and working together with SRM, vSAN and NSX, software can automatically handle many of the daily tasks. When more complex, critical problems arise, they’ll be flagged for the sysadmins, who will pull from their broad knowledge and nuanced understanding of storage, networks, applications and more, to triage and resolve them.

The sysadmins’ responsibilities won’t end there. By working at this higher level, they will be able to influence those systems in ways that help businesses operate more efficiently, cost-effectively and competitively. And that’s where their real value lies. Sysadmins of the future will be planners and problem solvers who leverage automated cloud environments and their advanced analytics capabilities. Like pilots, they’ll ensure the IT systems that businesses rely on can take them the enterprise where they it needs to go. 

By Janice Bedsole

In 2012, almost 39 percent of the CRM software market revenue was delivered by SaaS. Gartner forecasts the market to increase 42 percent by the end of 2013. During 2016, more than 50 percent of the CRM software revenue will be delivered by SaaS.

But overall, the CRM market is not showing big growth, demonstrating how companies like Salesforce could be disrupted. The overall market is expected to grow just 9.7 percent in 2013. That relatively small growth reflects how systems of record, such as CRM, are becoming less important in an appcentric economy.

Mobile CRM Apps To Grow 500% By 2014 via TechCrunch

Apps are where it’s at.  Mobile is doing to the web what the web did to client/server back in 2000.

(via enhatch)
Angwin says that among other things she bought “a $230 service that encrypted my data in the Internet cloud; a $35 privacy filter to shield my laptop screen from coffee-shop voyeurs; and a $420 subscription to a portable Internet service to bypass untrusted connections,” among other things. While this may seem excessive, Angwin says that it’s worth it to avoid attacks from hackers and to avoid having everything she does online tracked by major tech companies. What this really boils down to is how much you’re willing to let Google, Facebook and other tech firms stalk you.
The cost of online privacy: $2,200 a year - Yahoo News (via infoneer-pulse)
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